Life writing and human rights genres of testimony

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: We Shall Bear Witness:

Life writing and human rights genres of testimony

Life Writing and Human Rights: Genres of Testimony Deadline: Genres of Testimony The stories we tell about our lives and the lives of those around us leave footprints across history. That history can be of personal, familial or of widespread political and public importance.

Whether public or private, the telling of and the listening to life narratives is a concern of increasing importance across a range of disciplines, professions and practices.

Since the end of the First World War, politics has been increasingly expressed as and measured against norms categorised as human rights. The individual in relation to the state and states in their interactions with one another are, in theory and sometimes also in practice, governed by the legal architecture of human rights frameworks at national, regional and global levels.

These same processes may come into play in cases of domestic or private human rights abuses, where the victim must make public their suffering in order for it to be recognised, and for justice to be done.

The bulk of human rights defence and advocacy is based on making acts open to legal process.

Life writing and human rights: Genres of Testimony - Events - Kingston University London Details of the impact Building on the underpinning research, Campbell established the Military Writing Network.
International Life Narratives Research Group LNR We live in the age of life stories In every format of every media and in every academic discipline, self-reflection, life writing, offering one's life story within travel books, scholarly articles, broadcasts, political web sites or newspaper blogs has become a standard tool of communication and the dissemination of information in our time. While much is claimed for the value and significance of the life narrative, however, from the possibility of individual redemption to the constructing of national narratives of truth and reconciliation, the contexts of such constructions remain under-theorised.
Find a copy online Or rather, there is a reframing of these stories, so that instead of anger and despair, there is a gradual development of compassion and acceptance of their experiences and who they are.
Research students While much is claimed for the value and significance of the life narrative, however, from the possibility of individual redemption to the constructing of national narratives of truth and reconciliation, the contexts of such constructions remain under-theorised. Whether writing of our own lives in the form of auto-biography, memoir, Snapchat story or diary, testifying in a court of law, or in our endeavours to research and write the lives of others, there is little sharing of experience or debate upon the nature of such work across the many disciplines in which life narratives have become a central preoccupation.

For this to happen we need victims to testify. We need witnesses to write their autobiographies and memoirs and we need the media to investigate and report on atrocities. We need perpetrators to confess. We need the life stories of all those involved. What is the relationship between these two concerns: Human Rights and Life Narratives?

We are looking for work that will debate, among other things, the following questions How do the processes involved in the telling and compiling of testimony in extreme situations of crimes against humanity affect our perception of these events and our ability to prevent them?

How are such events named and changed in that naming? How are they described and what happens to that description in the legal, media, political and emotional life of the event over time?

We would particularly welcome papers, panels, workshops, performances or readings that:Get this from a library! Narrating Contested Lives: the Aesthetics of Life Writing in Human Rights Campaigns..

[Katja Kurz] -- Within the nascent field of interdisciplinary human rights studies, this volume explores activist autobiographies as collaborative projects within the context of human rights campaigns. It sheds. The last decades of the twentieth century witnessed the unprecedented rise in genres of life writing, narratives published primarily in the West1 but .

In collaboration with the University of Minnesota and Amnesty International, Jensen directed an international conference, Life Writing and Human Rights: Genres of Testimony, July , , at which the role of each of these genres in supporting the recovery of trauma survivors was first established.

In its representation of suffering humans, Dalit life writing gener- ates abject-types for (possible) ethical appropriation by a global literary field for human rights.

life writing and human rights genres of testimony

Life Writing and Human Rights: Genres of Testimony The stories we tell about our lives and the lives of those around us leave footprints across history.

That history can be of personal, familial or of widespread political and public importance. "The Lyric Sequence as Life Writing to Expose the Abuse of Human Rights: Nazım Hikmet’s P.M.

Poems. " Life Writing and Human Rights: Genres of Testimony Conference. Centre for Life Narratives, Kingston University, Kingston upon .

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