Understanding the ideal democracy in the united states according to the framers

Hey Edwin, This is a classic question that the majority of the modern population does not know the outcome. A republic or a democracy was debated in North America for decades of the eighteenth century.

Understanding the ideal democracy in the united states according to the framers

March Ivan Obolensky One way to create a stir with the Founding Fathers of the United States, if they were alive today, would be to announce the country they set up is now a democracy. A democracy is defined as: According to the Ancient Greeks, democracy was a combination of two words: Democracy started in Athens around BC and had two important characteristics.

Firstly, it was comprised of citizens who were male, over 20 years old, and from parents who were both born in Athens. Each citizen was eligible to speak and vote in the assembly which set the laws and made decisions as to war and peace. Each citizen had one vote and voted directly on each issue put before the assembly.

Votes were tallied, and the issue passed or failed. Secondly, government was run under the allotment system. This was a selection by lot such that ordinary citizens were appointed to government and court positions by chance, usually for a year. The Founding Fathers preferred to fashion the United States on the Roman model, which eschewed monarchy but allowed for indirect popular influence through elected representatives.

The Roman model of government had three branches: The legislative branch was made up of two bodies. The first was the Senate which was aristocratic and made up of former leaders of Rome.

The second was the Assembly made up of the populous which voted by tribe. The executive branch consisted of two Consuls who shared power and acted as heads of state in a manner similar to current presidents.

Lastly, a judicial branch existed made up of eight judges that the US Supreme Court was modeled on. It had checks and balances, limited representation by the people, and gave government various freedoms while restricting others.

There were, of course, opposing views as to how much government was required, how much representation should exist, and exactly what the powers of the Supreme Court should be. Opinions were far from unanimous and threatened to divide the nation even before it got started. This difference of opinion split many of the states down the middle between those for ratification Federalists and those against ratification Anti-Federalists.

The Anti-Federalists put forth the idea that the chief goal of government was to secure the rights and liberties of its citizens.

Understanding the ideal democracy in the united states according to the framers

The Federalists, on the other hand, countered that without a strong central government, the country would be unable to maintain adequate national security or formulate coherent foreign policy and thus be subject to the will of foreign powers.

Each put forth their points of view in written handouts and newspapers. The Constitution was ratified in by nine of the thirteen original states but by a narrow margin in each.Modern republicanism is a guiding political philosophy of the United States that has been a major part of American civic thought since its founding.

It stresses liberty and unalienable individual rights as central values, making people sovereign as a whole; rejects monarchy, aristocracy and inherited political power, expects citizens to be virtuous and faithful in their performance of civic. Modern republicanism is a guiding political philosophy of the United States that has been a major part of American civic thought since its founding.

It stresses liberty and unalienable individual rights as central values, making people sovereign as a whole; rejects monarchy, aristocracy and inherited political power; expects citizens to be .

Direct democracy was not what the framers of the United States Constitution envisioned for the nation. They saw a danger in tyranny of the majority. As a result, they advocated a representative democracy in the form of a constitutional republic over a direct democracy. This understanding of the Framers’ Constitution found expression in the modern era in a series of Supreme Court opinions in the s and ’40s.

In the Court’s famous footnote four in Carolene Products (), for example, the Court suggested that there are some circumstances in which there may be “narrower scope” for the usual.

Apr 13,  · The Framers of the Constitution understood democracy and republic to mean different things.? but that is not what we have in the United States, its a Republic with elected representatives (That's representative democracy, not pure democracy).

The Framers of the Constitution understood “democracy” and “republic” to Status: Resolved.

What Is a Democracy? [attheheels.com]

Democracy and the Founding Fathers. 1. March Ivan Obolensky.

Understanding the ideal democracy in the united states according to the framers

One way to create a stir with the Founding Fathers of the United States, if they were alive today, would be to announce the country they set up is now a democracy. According to the Ancient Greeks, democracy was a combination of two words: “Demos” meaning people and.

An Important Distinction: Democracy versus Republic